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How to frame different types of art
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How to frame
different art items
How to measure
art for framing
How to stretch
canvas
How to repair
torn canvas and 
damaged compo frames
-gold leafing

 

GICLEE
what is it
GLASS-MAT-WIRE
INSTALL

How to choose a frame for 
OILS OR ACRYLICS 

Oils and acrylic paintings have the same rules for framing.. No mats, NO glass, frame. 
A liner is OK if you like liners. I personally don't like liners so I don't use them at all. 
Pick a presentation that you like. If the painting is contemporary then pick an appropriate
frame and if the picture is an antique go for the antique, baroque frame.

BUT iT IS YOUR ART AND YOU CAN FRAME ANY WAY YOU LIKE. It is very popular 
right now to mix periods so the world is your option when it comes to framing. Just
remember to protect the value of your art.

It very popular right now to hang your art with no frame. You can do a gallery wrap in the 
deep stretcher bars and have the painting wrap around the bars (but remember this 
will do damage to the art so don't do this method on valuable pieces) Or you can stretch 
on the deep bars so that the art is on the top and the canvas is on the sides and then
paint the side a matching color or just plain black. This process is best done by the artist of the work so that 
there is no doubt about damaging the value of the art.

And if the art is not "squared" you will have a serious problem. You don't want to find out
in 10 years that your artist's work is now selling for $10,000.00 and you have reduced the value to "yard sale" 
value because you ruined it in the framing process. I am seeing a lot 
of artistic "junk" framing being done. And again that is fine if that is what the artist chose 
because it is part of the art presentation. I frame to the art work.

I do not care if my art work "matches" my decor. I buy art that I like and I want it to look 
it's very best "Sunday go to meeting" fashion.

If I owned the Mona Lisa .....I would NOT CARE IF IT MATCHED MY DRAPES. If your acrylics 
were done on paper in a watercolor style then use watercolor rules for framing. 
 

FRAMING PHOTOGRAPH 
AND A PAPER PRINT

PHOTOGRAPHY AND PAPER PRINTS: I grouped these together because the rules are 
somewhat the same. Pick a frame that looks best on the work. Either photo or a print 
may need a plain  frame or it may need an ornate decorative one. 
Your taste, your budget, your choice.

PHOTO: A photo normally does not need glass unless they have been matted. The Mat needs the glass. Most of the new photography paper will "stick"
to the glass and is hard to impossible to get it off without damaging the photograph. If this happens call your local 
frame shop, photographer or email me and I will help you try to fix it.

PRINTS, need glass for protection from air pollution, humidity, dust, and such:. and if matted the mat needs that glass protection.

Fine arts prints (signed and numbered) should have a mat and glass to protect them. and 
a poster type print should be mounted* and have glass, but not necessarily a mat, but a nice mat does afford the print 
more protection and does look nice on the wall.

*Mounting is where the print, photo, art is GLUED down to a heavy backing board. 
It keeps the piece from buckling when exposed to humidity. However, heavy humidity 
can even buckle the art work and the backing. Keep in mind that mounting also hurts/destroys the value of an expensive 
piece of paper art, unless the mounting is done 
by or "blessed" by the creating artist.

Fine art work should not be mounted by the purchaser because it does hurt the resale value of the art. The ARTIST 
can mount before the art is sold and there is no depreciation in the art. I always mount my paper art before I sell it 
that way the buyer does not have to worry about hurting the value of the art 
and does not have to suffer with buckling. Personal choice is many cases.  

 

SHADOWBOX FRAMING 
FOR DIMENSIONAL ITEMS

I think my favorite part of picture framing is the shadowboxing of special collector items.
These items are always unique and the job is always different. Some times it can be challenge,
but what a reward at the completion. I love doing the creative layout on the items, metals, 
scarves, picture, baby clothes, jewelry and all the lovely keep-sakes that my customers 
bring in to frame.

Always assemble and secure items so that will not damage each other. Gluing the back of 
a metal directly onto the frame backing is OK if you are using a removable glue. But I still prefer to stitch/wire it in place.

Glue a fabric items BIG NO NO. Use some common sense. Can I remove it later?

If you need to take it apart? can it be done? without damage to any art items?

Fabric items should be pinned or stitched. I once reframed a beautiful old garment with tons 
and tons of beading on the front and was shocked to see that the original framer had 
"hot glued" that beautiful aging garment to the backing board. I nearly cried. 

And obviously you need a frame with enough depth for the deepest items you are putting 
into the frame, plus the depth of the glass and back board. It is amazing how shallow a deep
frame is.

I have included a drawing of how we cut foam board sides for the frame and cover them with 
fabric. This side spacer hold in the glass and provides a place for the art work. The side 
spacers can be inside lined with colored mat board or you can fabric cover them.

show spacer for shadowboxing

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